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Nine

By Amanda Aring

She is nine.
As we sit with a group of students in one of Emma’s after-school activities, I have doubts about her ability to listen, sit still, and behave in the group, when she abruptly yells out, “Super Puppy!”

She then uses her superpowers to fly across the room, saving humanity from the evil Dr. CATastrophe. I close my eyes, sink into embarrassment, shake my head and think, “She doesn’t know how to navigate the world.” I cringe. “Why can’t she just sit and follow along?”

I was her.

When I was a child, I sometimes liked to pretend I was a dog. My house was underneath the orange, floral chair in the corner of our living room. I would hitch the loop of my leash around the chair leg and hang out there for hours, just being dog-like. I ate goldfish-shaped crackers out of a red, plastic Snoopy dog dish and barked at encroaching neighbors. My parents sat…

About the Author

Amanda Aring earned her BA in English from The Ohio State University where she works as an editor for the Center on Education and Training for Employment within the College of Education and Human Ecology. When she isn’t writing, she can be found shelving books in the youth section of her local library, reading, and attempting craft projects with varying degrees of success. Her favorite Dewey Decimal numbers are 100, 700, and 800. She lives in Dublin, Ohio with her family.

 

 

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