October 2018_Version2.png
 
UTGT_DEPT_ICONSS10.png

Travel Talk

By Ellen Holtzman

Each year as summer vacation approached, my dad—a short, rotund man—stopped at a travel agency near his office in Manhattan, loaded up on vacation brochures, and poured over them on the train ride back to Long Island.

Then he sat at the kitchen table and, in consultation with my mom, made his choice. Sometimes, as he considered a new destination, he would launch into a story about a past trip.

“So I find a jacket in the closet of the Tokyo hotel,” he once told me.

 “It looks good, and I decide to wear it to dinner at the hotel restaurant. Maybe it is some traditional Japanese costume that I don’t know about. As soon as we sit down at the table, a waiter brings his face close to mine and whispers in my ear, ‘Sir, you are wearing pajamas.’”

My dad, mom, and I erupted in laughter.

 

     

About the Author

Ellen Holtzman is a writer and a psychologist in Wakefield, Massachusetts. Her previous essays have appeared in Mothers Always Write, Intima: A Journal of Narrative Medicine, Cognoscenti, CommonHealth, and the anthology, Same Time Next Week.

 

 

TO READ THE REST OF THIS STORY,  BUY THE OCTOBER 2018 ISSUE HERE